Commissioners win 2021 Plan Canada Award for Article on Inequalities During COVID

Congratulations to current Commissioner Amina Yasin, and past Commissioner Daniella Fergusson for winning  the Canadian Institute of Planners 2021 Plan Canada Award for their article “Pandemic Patios and “Flat White” Urbanism originally published in Plan Canada Winter 2020 (Vol. 60 No. 4) issue. The article highlights how existing inequality in our society with already vulnerable members of our communities has been further compounded during the COVID-19 pandemic. Continue reading “Commissioners win 2021 Plan Canada Award for Article on Inequalities During COVID”

VCPC in the News — Broadway Subway

An artist’s rendering of the Mt. Pleasant SkyTrain Station.
The Vancouver City Planning Commissioner has long been interested in the planning for the Broadway Subway. Back in 2017, we submitted two memoranda to  Mayor and Council both recommending comprehensive, engaged land-use planning and urban design processes for the adjoining
areas and neighbourhoods.
March 8, 2017 | December 13, 2017
Commissioners have continued to follow and discuss the progress on the development of the Broadway, including receiving updates from city staff on their work. Last week, Commissioner Amina Yasin was interviewed by Dan Fumano for a story in the Vancouver Sun .  Her comments reflected the VCPC’s earlier recommendations, and added more specific examples of how broader planning could have helped  address some of Vancouver’s most pressing problems by making better use of the publicly owned stations sites.Here is what she had to say:
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Plan Canada: Social and Racial Equity Issue

Commissioner Amina Yasin and former Commissioner Daniella Fergusson co-edited the Spring 2021 edition of Plan Canada. This is a unique issue, proposed by Amina and Daniella in their role and co-chairs of the Canadian Institute of Planners’ Social Equity Committee. To provide adequate editorial flexibility and discretion, the editorial committee handed over the reins to the guest editors, giving them the opportunity and space to facilitate this important dialogue. Continue reading “Plan Canada: Social and Racial Equity Issue”

On This Date: The first Vancouver victim of the 1918 influenza epidemic dies

The flu ward at Vancouver General Hospital, 1918

October 8, 1918

Annie Sachs and her family
Annie Sachs, likely the first victim of the Spanish flu in Vancouver, with husband Fred Jacobs and daughter Freda, circa 1910. Image from Findagrave.com.

The first victim in Vancouver of the 1918 influenza epidemic—Annie Sachs—a mother of three young children – died on October 8, 1918. By October 27, 1918, 24 people in Vancouver died in a single day. By the end of the year, Vancouver had buried more than 600 victims of the Spanish flu. 

The flu epidemic—often called the “Spanish flu”—ripped through Vancouver in 1918 with a blind fury that rivalled the march of senseless deaths of the First World War.  After three waves, the infection finally subsided. One-third of Vancouver’s 100,000 residents had the flu; more than 900 died. Across the globe, the flu took the lives of more than 50 million people.

Impact on Planning and Development in Vancouver

Continue reading “On This Date: The first Vancouver victim of the 1918 influenza epidemic dies”

Event: AFTERSHOCK – Looking back at 1918 for a view of Vancouver’s future

Event Details

Date: October 27, 2020
Time: 7:00-8:30-pm
Via: Zoom

Event Description

The first victim in Vancouver of the 1918 influenza epidemic—Annie Sachs—a mother of three young children – died on October 8, 1918. By October 27, 1918, 24 people in Vancouver died in a single day. Before the disease’s fury was spent, almost one per cent of Vancouver’s population had died.

In the following decade, Vancouver underwent extraordinary changes in urban planning, design and architecture as World War One ended, the economy shuddered, protests filled the streets and cities re-invented themselves.

A century later, Vancouver is once again grappling with the effects of a pandemic. The boundaries between past and present begin to blur when we look closely at what happened in 1918 and where we are now.

Linking the past to our future, the Vancouver City Planning Commission’s Chronology Project is holding a panel discussion 102 years after that heartbreaking day when the virus claimed so many lives – October 27, 2020 – to explore how the 1918 influenza changed Vancouver and whether we should anticipate similar changes in the months and years ahead. The panel is part of a VCPC series of discussions on the post-pandemic city.

Continue reading “Event: AFTERSHOCK – Looking back at 1918 for a view of Vancouver’s future”